It’s Tommy this and Tommy that, and Tommy needs a job!

It’s Tommy this and Tommy that, and Tommy needs a job!

Barry Harris – Senior Advisor to Proelium Law LLP and UK military veteran – adds to his series of blogs aimed at veterans with some practical considerations when it comes to deciding what job to take.

In 1794, so legend or martial myth has it, at the Battle of Bokstel, the Duke of Wellington found a soldier lying wounded in the mud. “It’s all right, sir, all in a day’s work,” the injured Private Tommy Atkins told the Iron Duke.

Having left the military, hopefully in better shape than Tommy Atkins, your priority will probably be to achieve ‘a day’s work’.  So what skills do you have and what roles do they fit?  What have others done before you?

5 Reasons to Employ a Veteran:
  • Veterans have valuable attitudes and are adaptable;
  • Veterans make highly efficient employees;
  • Employing a veteran is good for business and society;
  • Veterans fill skills gaps;
  • Veterans have strong technical skills and unique qualities.

Where do veterans work?

 

The chart above comes from some analysis on LinkedIn, into where veterans have found employment.  It might give you some ideas.  Also, there are over 1,500 employers across the UK that have pledged their support to the Armed Forces community.  Whether serving or a Veteran, there is a multitude of employment sites dedicated to Armed Forces and able to offer professional, impartial and practical advice on all aspects of transition and work.

What are your general skills?

You may think of yourself as having limited or specialist skills. However, you probably also have most or all of the following:

  • Management / Leadership;
  • Decision-making or analytical skills;
  • Desire, Dedication, Discipline, and Determination;
  • Team-building Skills;
  • Mission-focussed and a will do attitude.

These are all characteristics that employers seek, but they can be taken for granted by servicemen and women.  In particular, in today’s workplace, the following skills are important.

Problem Solving

Given the closeness and camaraderie experienced in the Armed Forces, veterans are good at creating quick rapport, identifying needs and solving them – veterans are experienced in rapid problem-solving as providing solutions quickly and under pressure is something just about every Soldier, Sailor and Airman are familiar with.  Also, they are structured and have important organisational skills.

Tech-Savvy

Nowadays the military relies heavily upon state-of-the-art equipment and systems so most Armed Forces personnel are familiar with technology. That “know-how” and attention to detail provides a familiarity with technology and could lead to a position for a veteran managing or being part of a team focused on creating new technical products, fault finding, maintenance and servicing.

Conclusion

Veterans represent a unique, diverse and high-performing source of talent. Many companies are missing out on this great talent–pool due to a lack of knowledge about the military or misconceptions based on negative stereotypes. Often, unless a business is part of the military supply chain, or facing a specific skills shortage prompting them to look more widely for talent, they are unlikely to have considered the ex-military community as a potential source of talent. This feels like a missed opportunity, particularly at a time when companies are finding it hard to recruit.

Service in the Armed Forces fosters leadership, organisational skills, resilience and many other unique qualities which are a great asset to the private sector.  Don’t be shy about selling yourself!

Need advice?

If you’d like further information, or to discuss working with us, you can get in touch via our Contact Us page

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Proelium Law LLP

Proelium Law LLP is a Limited Liability Partnership registered in England and Wales No.OC411568.

Proelium Law LLP is authorised and regulated by the Solicitors Regulation Authority No. 629608 (www.sra.org.uk)

VAT Registration No. 242 4002 59.

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Heed the Call

Heed the Call

Barry Harris – senior advisor to Proelium Law LLP and proud UK military veteran – continues his series of blogs on veterans and reservists in the commercial world.

You took the Queens shilling, the bugle sounded, and you reported. Back in Civvy Street, now who is calling, how do you answer that call, and what are the hidden obstacles?

Negative Stereotypes

Assumptions and stereotypes about veterans can make some employers reluctant to employ them. Some companies consider PTSD to be an impediment to hiring a veteran. Businesses can believe that former Armed Forces personnel are only used to following orders, cannot take the initiative and are too rigid. In my first job interview as a Manager, I was once asked if I was going to spend my time shouting at people like a Windsor Davis parade ground marionette? Well no, of course not, I didn’t need to do that in the Army so I won’t do it here!

HR Managers can have a remarkably naive view of the science that is military man management, however companies that target veterans for recruitment highly value their creative thinking and ability to solve unusual problems.

Mismatched or Misunderstood Skills

HR managers readily comprehend a CV that shows a University degree and related job experience. It is not so clear to them what a Logistics Specialist or Petty Officer can contribute to a business venture. Do not bank on your operational experience, unless you are going to apply for a job with a re-enactment group! However many employers want and appreciate veterans because they know what they are getting: the mission focus; integrity; discipline; a sense of duty; and an ability to prevail against the odds. It is about translating those plentiful skills so that they are understandable on a CV.

Fear of Future Deployments

Some employers have concerns about hiring a veteran as they fear they may lose them for deployments, if former members of the Armed Forces are called up. The reality is that for most veterans, once they are out they are out (although if you have a reserve commitment or have gone on to become a full-time reservist, you do need to inform your employer).    When most veterans leave, they leave for good because they’ve made a decision to separate. With the cutbacks to the Armed Forces, employers have little to fear.

So work to dispel the stereotypes. Remember, veterans bring a lot of positives to the job.

“Veterans have a significant number of skills, which are of great value to a civilian employer. However, there is still a mismatch between the perception and reality of employing a Veteran. Equip yourself to overcome this obstacle.” 

Need advice?

If you’d like further information, or to discuss working with us, you can get in touch via our Contact Us page

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Proelium Law LLP

Proelium Law LLP is a Limited Liability Partnership registered in England and Wales No.OC411568.

Proelium Law LLP is authorised and regulated by the Solicitors Regulation Authority No. 629608 (www.sra.org.uk)

VAT Registration No. 242 4002 59.

© www.proeliumlaw.com

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Back in the Office on Monday

Back in the Office on Monday

As part of a series of blogs aimed at helping military veterans, Barry Harris – Senior Advisor to Proelium Law LLP and UK Army veteran – shares some views on how the firm supports veterans and reservists through employment.

“I was in the desert on Thursday and was back to work on Sunday,” said a reservist, speaking about his return from Iraq. After active service, many reservists then return to their civilian jobs within days.

You may think that businesses do not want workers who can be called away on military service. But as well as challenges, reservists’ double lives bring many benefits to business; arguably the “discipline, organisation and commitment” of reservists outweighs any risk.

Proelium Law LLP is immensely proud of the positive impact it has on the Armed Forces community. From its ‘Trusted Expert’ days many Veterans with specialist skills can find a network and employment and that is because we are passionate about supporting veterans and reservists and are committed to making a difference.

Proelium Law LLP is experienced in military matters, having many years’ personal experience of service, and is building a reputation as a veteran and reservist friendly employer.

Military service cultivates skills from operations and training, develops and hones communications skills, builds conflict and people management and team working skills and these are all attributes that a business can benefit from every day.

We are all stronger with veterans and reservists in the team.

Determination and perseverance against adversity is a recurring theme as a vital skill, which leads people to be successful. 

Need advice?

If you’d like further information, or to discuss working with us, you can get in touch via our Contact Us page

Read our latest news & articles

Proelium Law LLP

Proelium Law LLP is a Limited Liability Partnership registered in England and Wales No.OC411568.

Proelium Law LLP is authorised and regulated by the Solicitors Regulation Authority No. 629608 (www.sra.org.uk)

VAT Registration No. 242 4002 59.

© www.proeliumlaw.com

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Web Design by Tim Mitchell Design | Web Consultancy by John Griffin, Up Marketing Co

What else do you consider when choosing that job?

What else do you consider when choosing that job?

Barry Harris – Senior Advisor to Proelium Law LLP and UK military veteran – adds to his series of blogs aimed at service leavers with some practical considerations when it comes to deciding what job to take.

So, you are over that awkward feeling of self-promotion, and you are marketing yourself globally on Linkedin or Xing. You have also produced a great CV, and have been sending it out far and wide. Job offers are coming in, how do you choose which one to take?

Minimise your Commute

Commuting is stressful, sedentary, and a sacrifice of time and money. Keep the stress in your life to a minimum, you have had your fill of that while serving. Remember to look after yourself and three hours a day in a car will not help. Companies do not pay for you to get to and from work. Time and team are the most powerful tools that you have, don’t waste them travelling…..

What is your Expectation and Need?

Nearly everyone leaves the armed forces expecting a six-figure package, ‘cos civvies get paid more – don’t they?’  What do you need to cover, a mortgage, family, car? Look at the jobs advertised in your area, their salaries and the packages if offered. It will come as a surprise to you, so sit down.  Really work out what you NEED, not what you want, then aim for that.

Choose where to Basha Up

Where you come from or where the job will be? In a town or city, or in the countryside?  Will you have to commute to attain the higher salary you expect and need, or can you work at home or in your home town? Typically, many jobs involve travel nowadays, nationally or globally, and of course that is at the expense of the employer.

Fire and Returning Fire

Shoot those CV’s at your target jobs, even at unsolicited target employers. Be sure to have an excellent covering letter with each CV. Be sure that you follow up after two working weeks with a polite enquiry. If you were successful, you will surely hear from them. If you were not, find out why not, what needs changing, and how to improve your aim so as to hit the target next time. Don’t be disheartened, make each shot count for something, either it gets you to interview, or provides you with feedback which you can apply to zero your sights. Most HR departments will provide you with feedback on your application and CV, although you might find that many recruiters will not. Persist but remain professional.

Good Hunting!

There is a challenge in transition from service in the Armed Forces to civilian life, particularly employment, where forces personnel may lack a comparable employment history and qualification record. Proelium Law LLP recognises the wealth of transferable skills.

Need advice?

If you’d like further information, or to discuss working with us, you can get in touch via our Contact Us page

Read our latest news & articles

Proelium Law LLP

Proelium Law LLP is a Limited Liability Partnership registered in England and Wales No.OC411568.

Proelium Law LLP is authorised and regulated by the Solicitors Regulation Authority No. 629608 (www.sra.org.uk)

VAT Registration No. 242 4002 59.

© www.proeliumlaw.com

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Web Design by Tim Mitchell Design | Web Consultancy by John Griffin, Up Marketing Co

Drones as a threat

Drones as a threat

In this second of two blogs, Barry Harris, senior advisor to Proelium Law LLP and commercial Drone expert, gives an introduction to this new asymmetric threat.

The so called Islamic State’s use of Drones has, so far, been comparatively crude. Beginning in August 2014, the group would attach an explosive device to a small Drone and try to land it near military positions, as happened in October of 2014 when a toy aircraft fitted with a device exploded as Kurdish fighters were examining it near the northern city of Irbil. Initially the terrorist group favoured small helicopter-like Drones with four rotors and sufficient lift to carry a small bomb – usually a light mortar shell or similar device with stabilising fins and a detonator fuse to explode on impact.

“The Islamic State Army has revealed its use of the unmanned aircraft weapon for the first time,” the group’s al-Naba newsletter said. The article went on to describe “aerial bombardment” of Iraqi forces and said, “most of the hits were precise, and inflicted losses in the ranks of the apostates.” Since then, the group’s social-media pages have carried videos showing strikes by Drone. Not all find their targets, but Drone attacks have become a credible threat, Iraqi news accounts show.

Terrorist weapons, tactics, and techniques evolve on battlefields. As Daesh and other terrorist groups suffer defeat on the battlefield, they will commute their fight to domestic terror attacks. So, yes, there is a conceivable asymmetric threat to contemporary society from Drone attack.

Targeting densely populated areas such as stadiums, parks, and concerts present civilian targets of a density that does not need the accuracy of attack to achieve success. Terrorists like to escape, and the use of a Drone as a delivery platform provides that ability. The use of Drones to provide aerial attacks without warning on soft targets will also create a significant psychological advantage and thus achieve a central goal of terrorism.

To defend against such a threat is complex but far from impossible.  Denial of services such as electronic countermeasures on the Drone operating frequencies, and the local jamming of GPS reception could be effective. Physical capture of the Drone in-flight using net guns is a possibility. Designating “NO DRONE ZONES” will have a deterrent effect and physical defences such as covering nets that prevent Drones getting close enough to deliver a weapon might be effective.

Counter Drone security must become an essential part of law enforcement capability as the versatility of Drones will be exploited by people wishing to execute terror attacks. Active counter-Drone tactics, techniques, and procedures are essential for the safety of the population and will increasingly be seen to pervade our every day lives.

“The available evidence of IS UAV use is broadly limited to material released by the Islamic State or the various forces fighting against them. It is plausible that their use of COTS small UAVs is significantly higher than is widely recorded.”

Need advice?

If you’d like further information, or to discuss working with us, you can get in touch via our Contact Us page

Read our latest news & articles

Proelium Law LLP

Proelium Law LLP is a Limited Liability Partnership registered in England and Wales No.OC411568.

Proelium Law LLP is authorised and regulated by the Solicitors Regulation Authority No. 629608 (www.sra.org.uk)

VAT Registration No. 242 4002 59.

© www.proeliumlaw.com

proelium-image

Web Design by Tim Mitchell Design | Web Consultancy by John Griffin, Up Marketing Co

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